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How to get organised for The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane Day

Whether you’re training for The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane Day for the first time, or you’re a fun-run veteran, planning will be essential in making sure you reach the finish line feeling healthy and happy. In the lead-up to the big day, it’s important to get organised by outlining your goals for the run, setting a training routine, and considering what food you need to fuel your body.

Goal setting for success

Everyone takes part in an event like Bridge to Brisbane Day for their own reasons. Some want to beat last year’s PB, others want to improve their fitness, and most are keen to raise some money for a good cause. Thinking S.M.A.R.T can help you set healthy goals that are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timely.

The first key to goal setting is specificity – the more specific you are about what you want to achieve, the clearer you can be about what you need to do to get there. For example, you might set your goal this year to run the entire 5km course without stopping or walking.

Then, you want to make sure your goal is measurable. A goal like “run further” doesn’t give you a measurable outcome to tick off your list, whereas you’ll know you’ve achieved your goal of running 5km when you cross the finish line. You might break this goal down into smaller measurements, starting off aiming to run 2km by the end of the month, then build up your mini-goals over time.

Goals need to be achievable to be motivating. If you know deep down that you won’t be able to reach your goal, you won’t push yourself to get there. Think carefully when setting your goals and timelines, making sure you’re not setting yourself up for failure.

At the same time, be realistic about your goals. Take into account your current circumstances and whether you’re set up for success. If you’re going to need to train for an hour every day to build up to running 5km, but you’ve only got weekends spare, you might need to rethink how realistic your goal is.

Finally, every goal needs to have a timeline for when you plan to achieve it. Bridge to Brisbane Day is great for this, because once you’ve registered, you know that 27 August is the day!

Getting ready to run

Training is an important part of running in an event like Bridge to Brisbane Day. If you’re on the couch one day and running 10km the next, you might find yourself injury prone and not quite as fit as you thought.

The Healthier. Happier. 8 week training guide is designed to prepare both first timers and experienced walkers/runners for Bridge to Brisbane Day. There are three suggested training sessions each week (although you can swap or add sessions if you’re feeling up to it), with distances gradually increasing to help you complete your chosen course comfortably.

Remember that your training should include more than just distance running: stretching, strength training and cardio can all improve your running time and technique.

If you have any health concerns or injuries, seek advice from an appropriately qualified professional such as a GP or an Accredited Exercise Physiologist.

Food and drink to fuel your run

While physical training is important in the lead up to Bridge to Brisbane Day, the fuel you put in your body will also have an effect on how well you perform on the day.

Meal planning can help you eat healthier, shop smarter and curb bad eating habits. When you’re ramping up your exercise routine, it’s important to think ahead about what you’re going to eat and when, so that you’re giving your body enough energy to sustain your training. Having plenty of healthy food in the fridge and pantry can also stop you from reaching for unhealthy snacks when you get peckish after a run.

This Weekly Meal & Exercise Planner template can help you plan what you’ll be eating each week and when you’ll be strapping on your runners, with reminders about your weekly movement and nutrition goals.

Hydration is really important when you exercise, especially in Brisbane’s warm climate. You need to drink more water when you’re exercising to make up for water lost through sweat and exhalation. Plain water is optimal for re-hydrating after a workout: you don’t need sports drinks unless you’ve been doing over 60 minutes of hard exercise.

Being organised is essential!

With good planning and motivating goals, you’ll be set to have an incredible Bridge to Brisbane Day, and keep up your healthy lifestyle after you’ve crossed the finish line.

How are you preparing for Bridge to Brisbane Day? Let us know in the comments below or share your snaps with us using the hashtag #bridge2brisbane!  

Don’t forget to check out the Healthier. Happier. Training Guide in The Sunday Mail each week in the lead-up to race day.

Have you registered for Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017? Last year sold out, so enter NOW to ensure you are one of thousands of people pounding the pavement on August 27. Get your runners on! 

 

How to fit Bridge to Brisbane Day preparation into your busy schedule

As the temperature drops, so too can our motivation to get out and pound the pavement, but with Bridge to Brisbane Day only eight weeks away, it’s time to re-ignite the fire in your belly to go out and smash your fitness goals. If you’re a little stuck on where to get started, we’ve come up with a few ways that will help you put the prep in your race day preparation for Bridge to Brisbane Day

Take the scenic route

There’s nothing pleasant (or productive for that matter) about sitting in traffic for an hour and a half. Why not throw on some running shoes instead and take the scenic route to work? Brisbane is an incredibly exercise-friendly city, with walking tracks, bike lanes and shared pathways forming part of most major routes. Walking, running or cycling is a great opportunity to soak up some Vitamin D and appreciate our beautiful river city in the flesh. Plus, as we move further into winter, you won’t need to worry about arriving at work dripping in sweat.

Lunchtime workouts

After a long day at work, it’s natural to want to curl up on the couch at home, rather than get out and exercise. Why not switch up the timings a little and exercise during your lunch break? Many gyms have classes over the lunch period, or if classes aren’t your style, find a walking track near your office and get your heart rate up over lunch. Not only will it help your cardio fitness, but that burst of endorphins will also help you smash through your afternoon to-do list.

Outdoor meetings

Rather than battling the noise of a café, or trying to stay awake in a boardroom, why not suggest grabbing a coffee to go and going for a walk for your next meeting? In addition to the physical benefit of being active, studies have shown that exercise improves creative thinking. Now that’s killing two birds with one stone!

Fun with friends

Working out with friends enables you to exercise and socialise, while keeping you motivated and accountable. Instead of seeing it as a 5km, look at it as a 5km talk. Positive encouragement from your workout buddies and achieving milestones together will set you well on the way to achieving your race day goals.

The commercial workout

If you like to multi-task, this one’s for you! If you like coming home from a busy day and sitting down to watch the news, why not bust out the exercise mat and work out while watching?

There are loads of stretches and workouts you can do while watching your favourite reality TV show – a simple YouTube search will open your eyes to a plethora of at-home workouts suited to your fitness level and style.

How do you fit Bridge to Brisbane Day preparation into your daily routine? Let us know in the comments below or share your snaps with us using the hashtag #bridge2brisbane!  

Don’t forget to check out the Healthier. Happier. Training Guide in The Sunday Mail each week in the lead-up to race day.

Have you registered for Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017? Last year sold out, so enter NOW to ensure you are one of thousands of people pounding the pavement on August 27. Get your runners on!